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Frequently Asked Questions

Introductory questions

What is a non-party campaigner?

What is a non-party campaigner?

There are rules that govern people and organisations who campaign in the run up to elections but are not standing as a political party or candidate. We call these people “non-party campaigners”.

What is the role of the Electoral Commission?

What is the role of the Electoral Commission?

We are the regulator of political funding and spending.  There are rules about:

  • where political parties and non-party campaigners can receive funds from
  • how much they can spend on campaigning at certain elections
  • transparency in our political system

We work to ensure that people comply with these rules by:

  • providing advice and guidance to help people understand the rules
  • receiving, analysing and publishing information about political party and non-party campaigner donations and campaign spending monitoring how well the rules are being followed
  • dealing with possible breaches of the rules

You can find out more about our role at http://www.electoralcommission.org.uk/our-work/roles-and-responsibilities/our-role-as-regulator-of-political-party-finances.

What are the new rules for non-party campaigners?

What are the new rules for non-party campaigners?

Some of the existing rules were changed by the Transparency of Lobbying, Non Party Campaigning and Trade Union Administration Act 2014. This Act changed: 

  • when the rules apply 
  • the registration thresholds
  • which campaigning activities are covered 
  • the spending limits on regulated campaign activities
  • what campaigners must report to us

The new rules cover spending on a wider range of campaigning activities: 

  • election material (as currently covered) made available to members of the public 
  • canvassing, or market research seeking views or information from, members of the public. This may include activities such as encouraging people to vote a certain way using phone banks 
  • press conferences or media events which you organise 
  • transport in connection with publicising your campaign 
  • public rallies or other public events 

These new rules apply during a set time in the run-up to some elections. We call this time the regulated period.

When is the regulated period for the elections in May 2016?

When is the regulated period for the elections in May 2016?

The regulated period for general campaigning by non-party campaigners in the following elections will start on 5 January 2016:

  • Scottish Parliament
  • National Assembly for Wales
  • Northern Ireland Assembly

The rules on local campaigns apply to all elections across the UK in 2016. The regulated period for a local campaign usually starts on the day after the person you are campaigning for or against becomes a candidate and ends on polling day, 5 May 2016. For more information please see our guidance: Regulated Periods for non-party campaigners: Elections in May 2016.

What are the spending limits for the elections in May 2016?

What are the spending limits for the elections in May 2016?

The spending limit for a non-party campaigner will depend on whether you register with the Electoral Commission as a registered non-party campaigner. If you do not register, or are not eligible to register, you cannot spend more than £10,000 in any of Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland during the regulated period on regulated campaign activity. If you register with us, you will have a higher spending limit. You must stay within the spending limit for each part of the UK. The spending limits for the parts of the United Kingdom for May 2016 are set out in the table below.

Part of the UK

Registered campaigners

Unregistered campaigners

Scotland

£75,800

£10,000

Wales

£30,000

£10,000

Northern Ireland

£15,300

£10,000

Questions for charities

Our charity has been campaigning on a particular policy issue for many months or years. What happens if a political party endorses / supports our policy during the regulated period?

Our charity has been campaigning on a particular policy issue for many months or years. What happens if a political party endorses / supports our policy during the regulated period?

If you have a long term campaign that is closely aligned to a political party’s position on an issue, it will not automatically become regulated after the start of the regulated period. It will depend on the nature of your campaign activity and whether it meets the public and purpose tests.

Spending on your campaign will not become regulated simply because a party has publicly adopted a policy that you are already campaigning for. Similarly, spending on your campaign activity will not be regulated only because the policy issue which you have been campaigning on: 

  • becomes a major dividing line between political parties, or 
  • has always been aligned in the public’s view with a particular political party

So how will I know if I my activity counts as regulated?

In each case, it will depend on how you react to the support of the political party and whether you change your campaign as a result of that support.  Spending on your campaign will become regulated if you:

  • publicise the political party’s support in your subsequent campaigning; or
  • alter or increase your campaigning as a result of the political party’s support

Publicly welcoming the political party’s support will not generally meet the purpose test if the activity is undertaken shortly after the party’s policy announcement. For example, where a charity reacts publicly to policy announcements which clearly affect the achievement of its charitable purposes, this will not generally be regulated. However, if you continue to refer to the party’s support in future campaigning activity, that is likely to meet the purpose test. In particular, you would be likely to meet the purpose test if   you made continued reference to the party’s position in future campaigning activity during the regulated period after your initial welcome of the support.

Continuing to campaign in accordance with plans made before the party’s policy announcement will not be altering or increasing your campaigning in response to that announcement. By ‘altering or increasing your campaigning’ we mean spending on campaigning activity of a type and scale in reaction to the political party’s support and which you would not typically undertake in the usual course of your campaigning.   

We are a charity and therefore we never support or oppose a particular party or candidate. Why can our activities be regulated by electoral law?

We are a charity and therefore we never support or oppose a particular party or candidate. Why can our activities be regulated by electoral law?

Under charity law, charities must not support or oppose political parties or candidates. So in most cases, spending on charity campaigns that are in accordance with charity law will not be regulated under electoral law.

However there may be some circumstances where spending on certain campaigning activities may be regulated under electoral law. This is because campaign activity may meet the ‘purpose test’ even if:

  • it does not name a particular party or candidate (for example, if you are campaigning for a policy that is so closely and publicly associated with one or more political parties that it is reasonable to regard your campaign activity as intended to influence voters to vote for or against political parties or candidates ); or
  • you intend your campaign activity to achieve something else, such as raising awareness of an issue.

What if most of my policy areas are associated with political parties?

Campaigning on a policy issue that is publicly associated with a political party or raising awareness of an issue does not mean that it will necessarily be regulated.  It will depend on whether it meets the public and purpose tests in the legislation.

For example, if you were campaigning in the policy area before the policy issue became associated with that party, continuing to do so in the same way is unlikely to be regulated provided your campaign materials remain focussed on the policy issue rather than the party that supports or opposes it.  In addition, where you campaign in accordance with plans made before the policy became publicly associated with a party, the activity is unlikely to become regulated.  

As charities are obliged to act in furtherance of their charitable purposes, campaigning on a policy issue in furtherance of your charitable purposes will be less likely to meet the purpose test even if it is publicly associated with a particular party, provided your campaigning focuses on the policy issue concerned rather than the party or category of candidates. It’s important to think about how you are campaigning not just what you are campaigning on.

For example, if you have a campaign aimed at supporting or opposing proposed government legislation, it is un likely to meet the purpose test even though it is  closely associated with a political party or parties, if your campaign  is clearly aimed at supporting or opposing the proposed legislation of the government of the day, and not the proposed policies that the party or parties in government will take to the election.

It still feels like a lot of what I do could end up regulated?

This may well not be the case. If you are undertaking regulated campaign activity, you should also then think about how much you are actually spending on that activity.

You only need to register if you want to spend more than £20,000 in England or £10,000 in any of Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland on regulated campaign activity during the regulated period, to comply with the rules on spending and donations.

You do not need to register with us if you:

  • spend less than these amounts on regulated activity, or
  • are not spending money on regulated campaigning activities, or
  • are campaigning outside a regulated period  

Regulated campaign activity

What is regulated campaign activity?

What is regulated campaign activity?

The non-party campaigning rules apply to spending on what we call ‘regulated campaign activity’. The following will be ‘regulated campaign activity’ if they can reasonably be regarded as intended to influence voters to vote for or against political parties or categories of candidates, including political parties or categories of candidates who support or do not support particular policies or issues (we call this the ‘purpose test’):

  • press conferences or other media events that you organise
  • transport in connection with publicising your campaign

As well as meeting the purpose test, spending on the following activities is only regulated if the activities are also aimed at, seen or heard by, or involve the public (we call this the ‘public test’): This applies to:

  • the production or publication of election material (such as leaflets, adverts and websites)
  • canvassing and market research (including the use of phone banks)
  • public rallies and public events

This guidance explains how to apply these tests to campaign activities. To see more examples of how the rules apply, see our factsheets on Common campaigning techniques.

What activities aren't regulated?

What activities aren't regulated?

Spending on certain activities is not regulated:

  • services provided by volunteers
  • annual conferences of non-party campaigners
  • public processions or protest meetings in Northern Ireland, where notice has been given under the Public Processions (Northern Ireland) Act 1998
  • translations to or from Welsh from or into English
  • material, other than advertisements, in a newspaper or periodical
  • reasonable expenses that are incurred in relation to a disability (either by someone working on your activities, or to make your activities accessible to a member of the public)

Generally these activities will not be regulated if you do not involve the public:

  • lobbying or influencing MPs
  • Government or Parliamentary lobbying

Will activities at party conferences be regulated?

Will activities at party conferences be regulated?

To decide whether spending on your planned activities at a party’s annual conference is likely to be regulated, you will need to decide whether it meets the purpose and public tests. In our guidance Overview of regulated non-party campaigning we set out the factors that a campaigner should take into account in deciding whether the planned activity meets these tests.  

Organisations often have conference stands, hold fringe meetings and receptions at party conferences. If any of these activities only involves lobbying or influencing politicians and candidates, they will not be regulated. 

A campaign stand at a conference is unlikely to meet the purpose test as campaigners typically campaign to change a party policy rather than influence voter choice. Campaigning to change a party policy is unlikely to influence voter choice so long as it is neutral in tone, the content is not positive or negative to a party or parties, and the policy is not closely and publicly associated with a party. For more information see our Factsheet for non-party campaigners: Common campaigning techniques: Party conferences.

If you hold a fringe event and reception that is just for politicians and candidates, it will not be regulated by us. If members of the public attend, you will then need to consider whether what you are doing at the meeting will meet the purpose test. If you invite the media to attend a fringe meeting or reception, it may become a media event that is regulated by us if it meets the purpose test. If any of your activities are not lobbying or influencing on party policy issues, you will need to consider whether they meet the purpose test. 

You should follow the steps outlined in the guidance to assess whether spending on activities outside the perimeter of the conference will fall within the rules and be regulated.

 

Does planning and budgeting count as regulated campaign activity?

Does planning and budgeting count as regulated campaign activity?

It is only spending on regulated campaign activity which is regulated.  The five types of activity that are regulated are:

  • election material
  • canvassing and market research
  • public rallies or events
  • press conferences and media events
  • transport in connection with publicising your campaign.

All costs (including staff costs) that relate to the regulated campaign activity will count towards your spending limit (unless costs are explicitly excluded - see page 6 of our guidance Managing non-party campaign spending. For example, if you are producing leaflets or advertising, you must include the design and distribution costs. You must also include overheads or administrative costs which are associated with each activity. 

Costs such as those of staff involved in budgeting or planning will only count if they are a part of a specific campaign activity which is regulated.  If some planning or budgeting is a part of a regulated activity, for example the planning of a public event, then that could count as regulated spending because of the staff costs involved. Otherwise it will not be regulated.

 

Is campaign activity which supports or opposes Government policy regulated?

Is campaign activity which supports or opposes Government policy regulated?

Page 17 of our guidance Overview of regulated non-party campaigning explains how to apply the purpose test to campaigns which support or oppose government legislation.

Provided that your campaign activity is clearly aimed at supporting or opposing the proposed legislation of the government of the day, and not the proposed policies that the party or parties in government will take to the election, your campaign activity will generally not be regulated. 

However, if your campaign can reasonably be regarded as intended to influence who voters vote for at the election, as well as supporting or opposing the legislation, it will be considered regulated campaign activity.

The guidance also gives an example of how this might work in practice and explains how to apply the factors that you should take into account.

You should also take into account that even if you intend your campaign activity to achieve something else, such as raising awareness of an issue, it can still meet the purpose test. 

Is spending on social media activity regulated?

Is spending on social media activity regulated?

Generally, all material published on social media as part of a regulated campaign will meet the public test. You will also need to consider whether it meets the purpose test. For more information on how to apply the purpose test to social media, see page 10 of our guidance Overview of regulated campaign activity.

In many cases, the costs of posting material on a social media site, for example sending an individual tweet or updating a Facebook page, will be negligible. However, in some cases the costs may be more significant. 

For example, you may employ a staff member who spends a significant proportion of their time creating and posting material that meets the purpose test on a social media site, or you incur costs in producing or designing material, e.g. images or an e-flyer, that meet the purpose test and are posted on social media sites. For more information on social media, see our Factsheet for non-party campaigners: Common campaigning techniques: Social media.

Purpose and public tests

How do we apply the purpose test to our campaign activity?

How do we apply the purpose test to our campaign activity?

Spending on campaign activity will only be regulated if it can reasonably be regarded as intended to influence voters to vote for or against political parties or categories of candidates, including political parties or candidates who support or do not support particular policies or issues. We call this the purpose test. Please refer to page four of our overview of regulated non-party campaigning, which provides a number of factors to help campaigners to decide if their activity meets the purpose test. We also have factsheets that explain how to apply the public and purpose tests to common campaigning techniques.

Spending on campaign activity will only be regulated if it meets both the purpose and public test. 

How do we apply the public test to our campaign activity?

How do we apply the public test to our campaign activity?

If a campaign activity is aimed at, seen or heard by the public, or a section of the public it will meet the public test. Please refer to page seven of our overview of regulated non-party campaigning, which provides a number of factors to help campaigners to decide if their activity meets the purpose test. We also have factsheets that explain how to apply the public and purpose tests to common campaigning techniques.

Spending on campaign activity will only be regulated if it meets both the purpose and public test.


 

Is spending on social media activity regulated?

Is spending on social media activity regulated?

Generally, all material published on social media as part of a regulated campaign will meet the public test. You will also need to consider whether it meets the purpose test. For more information on how to apply the purpose test to social media, see page 10 of our guidance Overview of regulated campaign activity.

In many cases, the costs of posting material on a social media site, for example sending an individual tweet or updating a Facebook page, will be negligible. However, in some cases the costs may be more significant. 

For example, you may employ a staff member who spends a significant proportion of their time creating and posting material that meets the purpose test on a social media site, or you incur costs in producing or designing material, e.g. images or an e-flyer, that meet the purpose test and are posted on social media sites. For more information on social media, see our Factsheet for non-party campaigners: Common campaigning techniques: Social media.

Are our service users considered members of the public?

Are our service users considered members of the public?

Generally speaking, yes. Our view is that anyone who is not your member or committed supporter should generally be considered a member of the public. See page 7 of our guidance Overview of regulated campaign activity.

Where materials or events designed for your service users are concerned with service delivery or policy matters for your organisation, it is unlikely that they will meet the purpose test. If the material does not meet the purpose test then spending on that activity will not be regulated. However, if your campaign activity can reasonably be regarded as intended to influence your service users’ voting choice then it will meet the public and purpose tests and spending on that activity will be regulated. 

If our campaign activity is intended to raise awareness of an issue or achieve something else other than influence voters, can our campaign activity still meet the purpose test?

If our campaign activity is intended to raise awareness of an issue or achieve something else other than influence voters, can our campaign activity still meet the purpose test?

Yes, if it can also reasonably be regarded as intended to influence voters. Campaign activity which is intended to raise awareness of an issue or achieve something else other than influence voters will not necessarily meet the purpose test. For example, the issue you are campaigning on may not be closely and publicly associated with any particular political party, or the wider context may suggest that your campaign activity cannot reasonably be regarded as intended to influence voters.

However, section 85(4A) of PPERA says that it does not matter that any campaign activity was intended to achieve any other purpose if that campaign activity also meets the purpose test. If your campaign activity can reasonably be regarded as intended to influence voters, then regardless of any other purpose or intention your campaign activity has, it will meet the purpose test.

How do we apply the purpose test to our campaign activity on devolved issues?

How do we apply the purpose test to our campaign activity on devolved issues?

Campaigners must apply the purpose and public tests to all campaign activities whether or not they focus on devolved issues. Campaign activities which focus on devolved issues may also reasonably be regarded as intended to influence voters in relation to the UK Parliamentary general election.

For example, if your campaign activity focuses on candidates or parties who are contesting an election in a devolved legislature, or devolved issues, and

  • those candidates also represent parties which are contesting the UK Parliamentary general election, or
  • those parties are also contesting the UK Parliamentary general election, or
  • those issues are also closely and publicly associated with candidates or parties which are contesting the UK Parliamentary general election then your campaign activity is likely to meet the purpose test.
  • A campaign activity is less likely to meet the purpose test if it is aimed at supporting or opposing proposed government legislation, including devolved government legislation, rather than influencing voters.

Will activities at party conferences be regulated?

Will activities at party conferences be regulated?

To decide whether spending on your planned activities at a party’s annual conference is likely to be regulated, you will need to decide whether it meets the purpose and public tests. In our guidance Overview of regulated non-party campaigning we set out the factors that a campaigner should take into account in deciding whether the planned activity meets these tests.  

Organisations often have conference stands, hold fringe meetings and receptions at party conferences. If any of these activities only involves lobbying or influencing politicians and candidates, they will not be regulated. 

A campaign stand at a conference is unlikely to meet the purpose test as campaigners typically campaign to change a party policy rather than influence voter choice. Campaigning to change a party policy is unlikely to influence voter choice so long as it is neutral in tone, the content is not positive or negative to a party or parties, and the policy is not closely and publicly associated with a party. For more information see our Factsheet for non-party campaigners: Common campaigning techniques: Party conferences.

If you hold a fringe event and reception that is just for politicians and candidates, it will not be regulated by us. If members of the public attend, you will then need to consider whether what you are doing at the meeting will meet the purpose test. If you invite the media to attend a fringe meeting or reception, it may become a media event that is regulated by us if it meets the purpose test. If any of your activities are not lobbying or influencing on party policy issues, you will need to consider whether they meet the purpose test. 

You should follow the steps outlined in the guidance to assess whether spending on activities outside the perimeter of the conference will fall within the rules and be regulated.

 

Campaigning for or against Government policy

Is campaign activity which supports or opposes Government policy regulated?

Is campaign activity which supports or opposes Government policy regulated?

Page 17 of our guidance Overview of regulated non-party campaigning explains how to apply the purpose test to campaigns which support or oppose government legislation.

Provided that your campaign activity is clearly aimed at supporting or opposing the proposed legislation of the government of the day, and not the proposed policies that the party or parties in government will take to the election, your campaign activity will generally not be regulated. 

However, if your campaign can reasonably be regarded as intended to influence who voters vote for at the election, as well as supporting or opposing the legislation, it will be considered regulated campaign activity.

The guidance also gives an example of how this might work in practice and explains how to apply the factors that you should take into account.

You should also take into account that even if you intend your campaign activity to achieve something else, such as raising awareness of an issue, it can still meet the purpose test. 

Joint campaigning

We are an umbrella or membership organisation. If we spend money on regulated campaign activity, how will this affect our affiliates, member organisations or federated structure?

We are an umbrella or membership organisation. If we spend money on regulated campaign activity, how will this affect our affiliates, member organisations or federated structure?

You must first establish whether or not your relationship with the other organisations is one between separate organisations, or different parts of a single body.

If you are all parts of a single body, any spending on regulated campaign activity by any part of that body will count towards the spending limits for the whole body. Only the whole entity will be able to apply to register with us.

If each organisation is its own entity which makes its own decisions, you must then establish whether or not you are part of a joint campaign with the other organisations. If each organisation has its own campaign, and does not coordinate its actions with other organisations, there is no common plan and each organisation’s campaign activity will be treated separately.

If more than one organisation is involved in one campaign, and those organisations have coordinated their actions with others as part of that campaign, there is a joint campaign. In this case the combined joint campaign spending will count towards the spending limits of each organisation involved in that joint campaign.

If there is a joint campaign, you may wish to consider a joint campaign structure which involves lead campaigners and minor campaigners. Having a lead campaigner as part of a joint campaign lessens the regulatory burden on minor campaigners. However, this structure may not be suitable for all joint campaigns.

In all cases, you should read Joint campaigning for non-party campaigners for more information on the different types of joint campaign structure and on the legal requirements for those involved in a joint campaign.

 

Registering with us

Do I need to register for the elections in May 2016?

Do I need to register for the elections in May 2016?

If you spend, or plan to spend more than £10,000 in any of Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland on regulated campaign activity during the regulated period, you must register with us and comply with the rules on spending and donations.

You do not need to register with us if you:

  • spend less than these amounts, or
  • are not spending money on regulated campaigning activities, or
  • are campaigning outside a regulated period

Who can register?

Who can register?

Only the following types of individuals or organisations can register and become a registered non-party campaigner:

  • an individual registered on a UK electoral register or resident in the UK
  • a UK registered political party
  • a UK registered company which is incorporated in the EU and carries on business in the UK
  • a UK registered trade union
  • a UK registered Limited Liability partnership which carries on business in the UK
  • a UK registered friendly, industrial, provident or building society
  • a UK based unincorporated association that carries on the majority of its business or other activities in the UK
  • a body incorporated by Royal Charter
  • a charitable incorporated organisation
  • a Scottish partnership which carries on business in the UK

If you cannot register, you cannot spend more than £20,000 in England or £10,000 in Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland during a regulated period on regulated campaign activities.

How do I register?

How do I register?

You must apply to us, the Electoral Commission, to become a registered non-party campaigner. If you want to register, you can make an online application by visiting PEF Online. Alternatively, you can register with us by completing a 2 page form TP1 (PDF).

You can find more information on how to register as a non-party campaigner in our registering as a non-party campaigner guidance.

What if my organisation is two types of entity that are allowed to register (e.g. both a company and a trade union)?

What if my organisation is two types of entity that are allowed to register (e.g. both a company and a trade union)?

You can register as one or the other (unless one is ‘unincorporated association’, in which case it must be the other). This will affect which group of people who you will need to register with us as the relevant participators. Please see our registration guidance.

Please note that if you register as a trade union, for example, you must then spend your money on regulated campaign activity as a trade union.

What to report to us

What are the reporting requirements?

What are the reporting requirements?

Once you have registered, you will need to comply with spending and donations controls and reporting requirements.

As an overview, you must:

  • have a system in place within your organisation for authorising spending on regulated campaign activity
  • keep invoices and receipts for amounts over £200
  • report to us after the election your spending on regulated campaign activity if you have spent more than £10,000 in Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland
  • check that you can accept, and record, any donations you receive which are given towards your spending on regulated campaign activity and that are over £500
  • comply with the reporting requirements for donations you receive for spending on regulated campaign activity

Giving and receiving donations

What are the rules regarding permissibility of donations?

What are the rules regarding permissibility of donations?

The non-party campaigner rules cover all donations that are given towards your regulated campaign spending. The rules do not cover donations given for non-regulated campaign activity. Before you accept any donation of more than £500 you must take all reasonable steps to make sure you know the identity of the source of the donation and check that this source is permissible. You cannot accept a donation of more than £500 from an anonymous or non-permissible source. A full list of permissible sources and details of how and when to conduct your permissibility checks are outlined on p6-13 of our guidance, Permissibility for non-party campaigners. Our guidance on donations can be found here.

Can crowd funding be used to fund regulated campaign activity?

Can crowd funding be used to fund regulated campaign activity?

Crowd funding commonly involves donations being provided anonymously to a particular cause. Under the rules on donations, any donations over £500 towards the regulated campaign activity of a registered non-party campaigner must come from a permissible source. Anonymous donations are not permitted. Under the rules, any money, goods, services, or facilities provided towards your regulated campaign activity with a value of £500 or less is not a donation.

Unregistered non-party campaigners are not subject to the rules on donations.

Our approach to enforcement

What is the Electoral Commission's approach to enforcement?

What is the Electoral Commission's approach to enforcement?

The Commission acts at all times to maintain public confidence in the integrity of the electoral system. Although we will seek to achieve compliance and resolve issues without enforcement action when it is possible and reasonable to do so, we will take enforcement action where it is necessary and proportionate to do so. We do not take any action against anyone on the basis of a complaint, only when that complaint has been fully investigated and we are satisfied that a breach has occurred. The decision as to what, if any, penalty to impose will depend on the mitigating and aggravating factors surrounding that breach. 

Our enforcement policy sets out our approach to enforcement:

  • our investigations process and powers under the Political Parties, Elections and Referendums Act 2000 (PPERA) are detailed on pages 7-9
  • the sanctions available to the Commission are explained on pages 10-14
  • a list of mitigating and aggravating factors is set out on pages 15-16

How does the Electoral Commission respond to allegations?

How does the Electoral Commission respond to allegations?

We assess all allegations carefully and the assessment can include a number of actions, including:

  • reviewing documents provided to us
  • reviewing documents we already have, which may relate to a potential breach
  • seeking further information or clarification from the complainant
  • making initial inquiries of the subject of the allegation and other individuals or organisations where appropriate

If a breach is identified we may open a case review or investigation. Before we come to any conclusions we will consider any information or comments you may wish to provide. Any relevant information that you provide will be taken into consideration. However, wherever appropriate we will encourage compliance through advice and guidance and depending on the facts this could be appropriate where an organisation contacts us to tell us of an inadvertent not significant breach of the rules

For more information please see our enforcement policy.

Party or campaigner