What does an election pact look like

When we use the term 'election pact' we mean where a party or candidate reaches an agreement not to stand a candidate in a seat, in order to give another candidate or party a better chance of winning the seat. 

This could be an informal arrangement in a single seat or a more organised agreement by several parties across several seats. We have considered the rules in the following examples:

  • you are party A and you want to enter a pact with Party B. You publicise this and in doing so promote your party to voters.
  • you are Party A and you reach an agreement with Party B that you will not stand a candidate in a constituency. You do not announce the pact or campaign in any way.
  • You are party A and you reach an agreement with Party B that you will not stand a candidate in a constituency. You announce this publicly but you do not campaign.
  • you are Party A and you reach an agreement with Party B. You publicise the pact and promote the party or candidate of Party B in the constituency. 
  • you are Party A involved in a pact with several other parties across constituencies. There are public announcements and campaigning. 

If your party is campaigning for:

  • a candidate that is not standing in the name of your party 
  • another party

you might be treated as a non-party campaigner.

You should carefully consider in what capacity you are acting and where any spending should be reported. How you report spending will be a matter of the facts in each instance. 

 

Last updated: 1 November 2019