Which laws might apply?

The application of the rules in this area is complex and will vary according to the facts. If you are entering an election pact, please contact us to discuss your individual circumstances.

Party spending

Some spending might be your own party spending.

This is likely to be the case where spending is promoting your own party, for example where you are publicly proposing another party enter a pact with you.

Notional spending for the candidate

If you spend money promoting another party's candidate and the candidate makes use of that spending, then this will be notional spending for the candidate. The candidate will report it in their spending return as notional spending and as a donation from you. 

This is likely to be the case where you are working with the candidate on their campaign. You can find more information about how a candidate makes use of something and notional spending here. 

Notional spending for the party

If you spend money that promotes another party and the party makes use of it, this is notional spending for the party. They must report it in their spending return as notional spending and as a donation. 

This is likely to be the case where you are working with the party on their campaign. You can find more information about notional spending here

Local non-party campaigning

If you spend money campaigning for or against a particular candidate in a particular electoral area, and this spending is not used by the candidate, then this is local non-party campaigning. At a UK parliamentary general election, there is a £700 limit in a constituency. Over this limit needs to be authorised by the candidate's agent and appear in their return.

This is likely if you are spending money in a particular constituency but doing so independently of the candidate that you are supporting. You can find more information about local non-party campaigner spending here

General non-party campaigning

If you spend money campaigning for or against a number of candidates or parties over a number of electoral areas, and this spending is not used by the candidates or their parties, then this is general non-party campaigning. 

There are registration thresholds for general non-party campaigners in each part of the UK. If you intend to exceed these, you must register with us. Registered non-party campaigners get higher spending limits and must report their spending at the end of each election.

This is likely to apply if you are spending money promoting candidates or parties over a number of constituencies, but doing so independently of the candidates and parties you are supporting. You can find more information about general non-party campaigner spending here

Last updated: 1 November 2019